Tweets

Blatant hypocrisy in the “discussion on race”, as per usual

LZ Granderson, a regular contributor to CNN Opinion, has actually surprised me over the last year or so in his effort to take a more centrist approach to things.  While I do not particularly like the term “centrist” personally, for it implies that there is some good to be had in taking a middle ground between polar opinions (or that dueling sides in a political debate both possess some good opinions– they don’t), for a guy like LZ to take a step to the center I was kind of impressed.  In fact, there were a few times where I even agreed with the man’s opinion on a thing or two.  That’s unprecedented for me.  While LZ has never exhibited the blind and apathetic ignorance of the likes of MSNBC’s Toure, who has been in hiding since our Twitter scuffle a few months back, he most certainly has played the race card in his opinion pieces more than once, and he most definitely played that same card today.

Police shot and killed a young black man in Missouri, 18 years of age, who was apparently unarmed.  I’ve heard various accounts of the story, but I suppose that’s expected when something is so fresh- with much left to be discovered, and understood.  Of course, as we saw with the Trayvon Martin shooting, no evidence, investigation, FBI involvement, or anything in between will do anything to put a damper on the unfortunate events that took place, nor will they ever allow for the police officer responsible for taking the shot to be able to live or sleep in peace ever again.  The verdict is in– not just from LZ, but by the usual suspects who heard about this and frothed at the mouth just as they did after the death of Eric Garner in Staten Island (which also happens to be my hometown).  The suspects I am referring to of course are none other than Al Sharpton and Jesse Jackson, and it’s only a matter of time before we see their faces on television denouncing police officers nationwide, and calling on the mayor of St. Louis to do something about supposed “police violence”.

While the death of a young man is always an unfortunate thing, even if they were living a life of crime, it is important to understand situations like these through a lens of harsh truth- a dose of reality that no one in the mainstream media has the balls to bring up.  So I guess I’ll be the guy to do it, as always.

Ferguson, Missouri is where 18 year old Michael Brown was shot and killed by a police officer the other day.  Ferguson, what people aren’t mentioning, is a dirty and crime-riddled part of St. Louis– in fact, it wears the badge of honor as the worst neighborhood in its general vicinity by a fair margin.  Though I was too young to fully grasp the situation in New York City prior to the Giuliani years, I knew (as I’ve mentioned here before) that the city was a place where we just did not go.  It was off limits.  As someone who got to witness how NYC got cleaned up over time and became a beacon of light of the east coast, I could only imagine the kind of hard work and sacrifice the brave men and women of the NYPD had to endure to ensure things did not relapse back to the David Dinkins era of lawlessness.  As such, I could not even begin to imagine what the police force in a city like St. Louis, and in a town like Ferguson, have to deal with on a daily basis. And neither can LZ Granderson.

Having said that, and just as I said when I discussed the Trayvon case, none of the crime statistics or facts about how terrible a place Ferguson is validates what the police officer did.  One account of the incident claimed that Brown tried to take the officer’s gun, and fled when he failed, only to be shot in retaliation.  Whether or not the officer’s use of force was warranted is not something that can be determined with the help of a few articles on CNN or Fox, but if such a scenario is indeed true, I think it provides an important glimpse into the kind of people the police in Ferguson are expected to deal with.

But I digress– my target here is LZ Granderson’s ideology.  It was his article alone that brought me out of my month-long hiatus to pen this in the first place.

In his piece, LZ claims to be tired:

Tired of our streets being peppered with dead, unarmed black people. Tired of listening to armed assailants describe how they feared for their lives. Tired of being told “this has nothing to do with race.”

I am tired of seeing a hashtag in front of a victim’s name on Twitter. Tired of seeing Al Sharpton speak on behalf of a family. Tired of waiting for verdicts and hoping for justice –as if hearing “guilty” can ease the anxiety of knowing a police officer shot and killed a 22-year-old black man while he was lying face down and with his hands behind his back.

I’m tired of unarmed dead black people being put on trial. I’m tired of politicians visiting our churches for votes but skipping out on these funerals

I’m tired of hearing mothers and fathers weep for children who did not have to die.

But most of all I’m tired of the people who are not tired like me.

You know what I’m tired of LZ?  I am tired of just about every single one of our major urban city centers, dominantly led by progressive leftists, destroying the lives and the potential of millions of young, black people and forcing them into the unfortunate livelihoods that they so often lead for the sake of a vote.  I am tired of cities like St. Louis, which haven’t experienced Republican leadership in decades, allowing their lower classes- often dominated by minorities and people who have historically been shafted (when they weren’t being murdered, of course) by Democrats- to fester and to devolve into locales so deeply steeped in the welfare state and government reliance that the very talk of “hope” or “change” is not only a ridiculous fantasy, but also insulting.  I am tired of people, like you LZ, who don’t say a fucking word when hundreds, or thousands of young black people- no different from people like Michael Brown- die by the hands of fellow black people every single year.  I am tired of celebrities like Lebron James wearing a hooded sweatshirt during warm-ups in honor of one black murder victim, while neglecting to wear one a few thousand more times during the season in honor of the other young black people who might have also taken their last breaths in a hoodie.

I am tired of people like you, LZ, claiming to be tired of Al Sharpton having to “speak on behalf of a family” when Al sure as hell is not tired of doing so. I am tired of people like you not realizing that people like Al absolutely love this.  I am tired of people like Al- individuals with blood on their hands themselves- who have so much hatred built up in their hearts that they are completely unwilling and unable to espouse upon the millions of people in the black community who look to them for guidance that a young black man in America is exponentially safer standing next to a police officer than next to one of his friends, in his own neighborhood.  Why?  Because black people are murdered by black people about 93% of the time.  I am tired of people disregarding just how many black victims are made by black perpetrators- as if the frequency of police officers shooting black men or women has ever, or could ever even come remotely close to matching that percentage.

The hypocrisy of those like Sharpton, who routinely profit and gain power at the expense of young, black lives is nothing less than apparent.  Unfortunately, no one cares much about confronting it.  Opinions like LZ’s affirm the notion that little could ever be done to curb the hatred that people feel towards a group that does so little to harm them, and does even less to harm them when compared to how often they harm each other.  The sickest part of this all is that those who are now running rampant through the streets of Ferguson, throwing bottles at police, torching stuff, and looting stores likely voted, and will continue to vote for the same progressive liberals that banished them into their low social class and shackled their ankles to its foundation for eternity.

And LZ will keep voting that way too.

Lyndon Baines Johnson is laughing in Hell.

So one time I wrote about…

…the newest trend in media, which is to make everything a list, a picture, an emotion, blahh blaaaaah blaaahhhhhh.  Into a whatever- anything but paragraphs and complete statements.  At the time, I didn’t get into much detail about that observation and I didn’t expand upon my point much further than noting that it was becoming hard to read news on the internet these days in general. Today I am going to revisit the topic in a very unprofessional and non-academic way.

My forever-growing, people-who-regularly-embarrass-themselves-on-Twitter bookmark tab in Firefox has seen some recent additions.  Recently I have often found myself being directed to Vox– a company which challenges us to “understand the news”, which is its write-up on Twitter.  It’s not difficult to discern that Vox is just another progressive, heal-the-world hack job of a news source, but it’s worth a glance every now and then to get a giggle out of some of the plans they dredge up from the bowels of progressitopia.

Just a few minutes ago, I pulled up their page on Twitter.  Now tell me- since we all know that progressives write and/or speak to no one and for no one but each other, do these look like articles addressed to an educated, intellectual, or well-informed public?  Write to your audience, right?  It seems Vox is doing a little more talking down to people than they are talking to them– not much of a surprise considering one of DC’s biggest morons, Matt Yglesias, is their “executive editor”.

Behold, the intellectual beauty that is Vox (Beware, this is about to get long):

 

 

I stopped right about here.  There were a few links to articles that seemed “normal” on the surface, but I did not check into them, nor care enough see if they were anything more than articles saturated with lists, charts, and chatter about how “scary” their lessons were.  No, Vox, I don’t give a damn about what “Transformers 4 teaches us about economics”, and I know that it is difficult to go an hour without pondering his worldview but no, I don’t give a damn about what George Takei thinks, about anything, at any time.

Through the first twenty or so tweets from Vox, in its quest to help us “understand the news”, we got:

…tips about which board games adults should play (as if hipsters need one more reason to move to Brooklyn and not work), the ANSWER to the “Great American Soft Drink Debate” which seeks to answer whether or not it’s called “pop” or “soda” (answer: it’s SODA, why?  Because whatever a New Yorker says is always correct), the FIVE (not six) ways that Seinfeld has changed television, 21 charts that depict how America is changing- one that I actually checked out, and was not even slightly shocked to find it was full of “well, duh” factoids like “we’re becoming less religious” or the ever-important “we’re moving west in larger numbers”, a map that gave us insight into– now wait, make sure you’re sitting down– how people in countries that see its populace making better, and more stable livings, pay a smaller percentage of their annual incomes on food, a single graph which is reportedly nothing but a straight line and has Ezra Klein nearly in tears over it, because it shows that people have little power and that the dreaded oligarchy has become us (what do you think happens when we spit upon republicanism for the better part of a century?), another amazing list which names Ireland the #1 “goodest” country while the United States came in a miserable 21st, another map of the top beers in each state, an article that will take you to the next level at your weekend Rock, Papers, Scissors club using “science” (of course), 4 tips from a food scientist about the art of barbecue, 5 songs released this week that you just have to hear, an article explaining how it really is alright to swim right after you eat, and finally- THE single most important fact about American politics.  No, I didn’t bother seeing what that fact was.  Knowing Vox it wasn’t much of a fact anyway.

Phew, I’m beat.  And that was after skimming through but twenty or thirty of the hundreds of tweets Vox makes per day.  They’re not the only ones guilty of this massacre of the brain, have no doubt, but I have never seen such fluff condensed into one package, in such volume.  This company defines bullshit news, yet over 100k people seem to be interested enough to follow it daily.

And we wonder why we have low-information voters?  Because we are a nation of low-information voters.  Plain and simple.

On last week’s Toure incident

For years now I have been telling friends that one of my life goals is to become famous and get featured on TMZ.com.  After coming home last week one afternoon from work and seeing my Twitter exchange with MSNBC’s Toure go somewhat viral– hitting Twitchy, the Daily Caller, the blogs of multiple progressive low-life lacktivists (word I just made up…just think about it for a second), and even The Blaze– I can safely say that fame is something I no longer wish to have.

Screw that.  It’s not fun, it’s not enjoyable, and even though I barely even experienced 1/100th of 1% of what your average celebrity must experience every day when they leave their house or apartment, I can confirm that it is not that awesome.  I write on this website anonymously– not to “hide”, but because I do not believe that the concept of liberty needs to have a face or a figurehead.  I do not claim to speak for the whole, but rather I write as a voice offering a different perspective on some of the topics we often hear about daily in newspapers or on television.  My goal is to examine issues from a new angle– an angle often dismissed, or shunned by people of prestige, power, and influence.  People exactly like Toure– and they have been doing it for a long, long time.  I get brash, and I make some very real statements which I deem to be true.  I do not exist in a position of power like Toure does, and he should have known better than to get so careless about how he tried to inject race into something that he had to know was going to segue into an all-out rage from the Twitterverse.  He brought that on himself.  I on the other hand do not have anyone to answer to, and do not owe anyone a toned-down, or more “sensitive” approach to the topic of race in America.  Plenty of brave souls have tried that, and every single one of them has been summarily ignored and labeled a racist by the militant left.

If I’m going to be labeled ‘racist’ for what are arguments against racism, and accusations that the nation’s progressive contingent is perhaps the most relentless band of racists this nation has ever known, I sure as hell won’t be the “nice” guy while doing so.

I addressed this via Twitter, but I most definitely understood what Toure meant when he initially replied to me with “The power of whiteness”, after I mentioned the story of my grandfather and his surviving imprisonment in Dachau.  Had I expected the fire to ignite like it did (I only found out about it via a Facebook message from a friend, hours after its beginning), I might have stuck around and made note of a few facts for people:  that I was not Jewish, as many outlets claimed, that I understood Toure was talking about my family’s “white power” and how that helped us after coming to the States, and so on.  But you know what?  In hindsight, this worked out just fine.  Toure has been making brash statements about race for years now, and if he were a white guy pulling such nonsense, he would be fired or asked to resign.  He would be the Donald Sterling of MSNBC, except he wouldn’t get a $2 billion severance check.

But I am not writing this post to simply recall the events of last week in detail– a week in which for the first time ever, Toure just stopped using Twitter for days on end, which I can only assume was evidence of his bosses figuring out the best way to approach the fallout from his irresponsible tweeting.  The truth is, I didn’t even expect an apology (and didn’t get one, though he did make one to the general public a few days ago), nor did I want one.  I believe in the concept of free speech, for everyone, and in every medium in which that speech exists.  What I find a ridiculous amount of irony in, however, is how people like Toure will praise the firing of television personalities, or support forcing people to sell their basketball teams, yet they will talk themselves out of problems (or just tweet their way out of them) as if there is no measure of equivalence between these differing brands of supposed “hate”.  I will continue to call people out who persist in abusing their power and privilege in the media, just as Toure does, while doing so much to trample on the freedoms of others– and typically in the name of “freedom”, or “equality” at that, which is laughable.

But moving on–

I wanted to address my position from my tweet to Toure first, and discuss the motivation behind it.  I read a lot of criticism about it, and a lot of ridiculous conjecture as to what I “meant”, for example, when I capitalized the word “LEGALLY”, and make things more clear.  Here’s the tweet for reference:

Toure, as usual, was pushing some bullshit idea– this time by promoting an article about the concept of white privilege, reparations, and its applicability in today’s America.  The truth is I didn’t even read the article he posted.  Why?  Because Toure has a long and well-documented history of bashing white people and drumming up race wars via Twitter, or during his time on television, and I didn’t need to reference some random article he skimmed to understand the motivation behind his support of something like reparations.  The justifications for any kind of reparation-based system, regardless of what they were, did not matter to me– I cannot even tell you who wrote the article, and I won’t be able to tell you anytime soon.  I just don’t care.  This was about Toure and his incessant race-baiting- and that’s it.  Also, and just to fit the explanation in here, I only referenced my family’s “LEGAL” immigration to the States so as to bolster the legitimacy of it, and not to claim that people fleeing to the States for other reasons have done so illegally…though millions obviously have, and still do.

My statement to him was about responsibility.  In other words, I was asking what hand my family played in the many atrocities committed against people of color from our nation’s past– how in the run up to some of our most trying times post-slavery, my family wasn’t involved in the rape, murder, house burning, and segregation of black people (that was all done by Democrats), rather, they were either imprisoned in Dachau (which was where my grandfather found himself during the war as a prisoner), or running from Nazis, and even the Soviets.  My issue with not just Toure’s promotion of reparations, but of the “race card” in general, comes down to how such tactics are entirely abstract, passively blameless, and entirely responsible for the “blame everyone but yourself” mindset that progressive culture creates.

The crazy thing here is this:  if people made an argument about “white privilege” in a way that did not a.) blame people with absolutely zero connection to our country’s dark past for it, b.) belittle those who accepted no help from the government and still made things work, or c.) entirely excuse people who just might not be that good at something, skilled enough at something, or determined enough to pave their own way, we might actually have a conversation where we look at the problem as one we would love to lend a hand towards solving together.  As it stands, the idea of “liberty” is a no go in bridging that divide, and even people like Toure have claimed that “jobs aren’t the answer for unemployment” (I’m paraphrasing because the position is too stupid to devote time towards Googling for the actual quote, but yes, that’s what the man said).  None of the liberty movement’s (or as Toure would claim, none of the “extremist right-wing”) positions are good enough to help create equality, so what we are left with is an onslaught of government-heavy legislation which, intentionally, breeds dependence.  You know, I had to laugh when Toure tweeted a picture of him reading Rules for Radicals in first class during one of his recent trips– Toure isn’t man enough to be a radical, and he isn’t autonomous enough, or “colorblind” enough to imagine a world without the government holding the hands of the citizenry through every step down the path of life.  I called Toure out because he is ignorant, hypocritical, and gets a pass for just about everything he says– including what he said to me about the “power of whiteness”.  But more so, I monitor what he says and criticize him often due to his constant support of government-enabled dependence and despair.  Toure is the antithesis of radicalism.

I did not start this conversation with him expecting it to stretch into days of banter, inquiries from news media about my grandfather’s story, or to become a Twitter and blogosphere sensation.  I did not particularly love coming home to 700-1000 Twitter notifications, even though it was interesting to check out what people were saying about the incident, and it became tedious though the vast majority of it revolved around Toure’s condemnation from the public– something long overdue.  I write as a means of voicing an opinion that is too often dismissed, for all of the wrong reasons, by the country’s political and media elite.  One such “reason”, and often from the folks at MSNBC, is for the liberty movement’s “obvious racism”, which oddly enough goes without evidence just about every single time it is proclaimed.  I write to act as a vector from the sidelines, for other “little people”– those of us who might remain silent in the face of Facebook friends, coworkers, and relatives who speak with complete freedom because progressivism is “like sooo coool mannnnn“, and because they’re so into “like progress and not hate, maannnnnn“.

Progressivism is nothing more than a more academic term for “poser”.

Earlier I made reference to the term “lacktivist”.  In other words, an activist that lacks the substance necessary to make their end goals come to fruition.  This is the very definition of the American progressive.  Toure, Maddow, Harris-Perry, Matthews, Gore, Moore, deBlasio, Bloomberg (yes, Bloomberg), Matt Yglesias, Joan Walsh from Salon.com, every single contributor to Think Progress, etc.  These are lacktivists.  They are individuals, often ridiculously privileged in their own right, with minds obviously intelligent enough and coordinated enough to find success and generate ideas, but their emotions enable them to do nothing more than consider their good intentions and “caring” to be all that is necessary for the eradication of the societal ills they simply cannot shut up about.  It is all talk, and no substance– and in five or ten years when the newest, progressive “caring” initiative fails, they figure out a way to convince the poor souls they are ritualistically screwing over that it’s the Republicans’ fault for not giving enough money to the cause.  For as much as progressives love to wail about the billionaire Koch Brothers (looking at you, Harry Reid), they sure do settle on “money” a lot as to the reason why their utopian, castle-in-the-sky fantasies never seem to pan out.

I did not create this discussion with Toure to minimize the severity of what slavery was, or to detract from the gaps in society something more recent like segregation has caused.  No shit there have been negative effects in the aftermath of those horrendous events– even effects which have spilled into, and influence the way we live our lives today.  But get this– they were all Democrat-created things.  Every single one of them.  And today, in my blog, I often discuss how the same “ownership”, dehumanization, and liberty-suffocating principles (which was in essence what slavery was) of the “old” DNC are very much alive and well in today’s DNC and its progressive, demagogue pulse.  I will continue to point this out, regardless of who I piss off and who it “insults”.  If this correlation startles you, then please consider how Democrats, in the decades since the New Deal, have run urban populations into the ground, into poverty, and continue to do so through today.  Please explain how our first black President, a man that was anointed as a political messiah as the savior of America’s downtrodden, and given Nobel Peace Prizes before even so much as lifting a finger, has managed to ensure those in the lower classes are only slipping deeper into the holes that either they, or society has dug for them– worse off than ever before.

But no– keep blaming the Koch brothers and “corporations”.  That’s the spirit.

Perhaps if I write enough of these blog posts, it will finally click in the minds of a few people that making the poor poorer is the intent and not the problem progressives are trying to solve.  Toure, or any of the other folks I have mentioned, might not see things this way anytime soon, but if by chance I influence just one person in a way that enables them to see things in a scope wider than the foolishly simplistic and infantile way they see things now, this entire hobby of mine can be considered a success.  At least by my own standards, anyway.

Until then, liberty needs to be promoted, every day and always.  Adherence to our founding traditions of republicanism, as a nation which allowed democracy to happen, needs to be exercised.  And when people of power seek to use their atrociously biased influence to ensure we continue to set our nation “back”, which is often what they claim to be fighting so vehemently against, they need to be called out.  It just so happens I have gotten tired of being labeled as ignorant or racist because I happened to be born a white male, into a family that has been successful– this is how I started to create public discussions about race.  And it is quite alarming just how often we allow people like Toure to slip race into the equation when there are so many good people in this world who go about their days not giving a shit about what color someone’s skin is.

Until next time, with liberty, and justice for all.