Chains

A new American era.

Folks, it looked bad for awhile there for Donald Trump but just look at what a difference a few weeks can make in the world of politics!  The sponge of Clinton corruption finally hit the point of saturation (it’s a really big sponge), and now the media- try as it might- cannot do a thing to stop it.  People on Reddit are better at spreading the news than the people who are being paid for, and have made careers out of delivering the news.

As someone who served in the military in a position that required a security clearance, something needs to be said about WikiLeaks.  After the NSA leaks (which I’ve never looked at), I held a great deal of contempt for Julian Assange and his crew.  For one, I have worked with many of the programs mentioned in those leaks, and know that not only were they horrifically misunderstood, but their exposure to the public really messed with our capabilities as a whole within the Intelligence Community.  In this regard, I cannot sympathize with the WikiLeaks mission entirely and I cannot support them unequivocally.  However, I can get over all of that knowing how the general public could never be in a position of total understanding and I know that their concerns were genuine. (more…)

The unholy faults of loaded questions

I came across something on Facebook today, linked from a friend, but its content was not as important as its overall message.  To further clarify, I need not link this article here for the purpose of this post is to highlight its underlying (and false) message more than to nitpick a single example.  Beyond that, the article- from its title through its content- was far from unique.  In fact a quick Google search of the article’s title returns nearly 8 million hits– many of which share the exact same title, from different authors, on behalf of different organizations, and from various years.  The articles seek to answer a seemingly simple question:  “Was Jesus a socialist?”

One could take such a question and run with it in a number of directions.  The answer could come from the standpoint of Jesus as a divine being, the son of God, a pacifying and unifying resource of all mankind, and a practitioner of many miracles.  Or, an answer to the question could be derived from an entirely secular perspective– Jesus was a man who has a place in history; a man who led others in many admirable ways, but nonetheless he was a man of flesh and blood more than he was a descendant of the heavens.

Regardless, the perspective by which Jesus is examined within the scope of the question begins with a fundamentally flawed, dangerous, and dishonest premise: that Jesus’ actions, in any way whatsoever, resembled that of socialism in practice.  The point of such articles these days is not to examine the nature by which Jesus practiced charity and grace, rather, their point is to link the concept of socialism with that same charity and selflessness.  This, of course, is a bold-faced lie.

Now, modern socialists often seek to separate the tenets of socialism from the grievances so often witnessed by those societies who have chosen to practice it.  The shift from preaching the supposed goodness of socialism as a political and governmental framework was necessary since socialism has not, and nor will it ever produce results that coincide with the words or good deeds of Jesus whether they be holy or human.  Socialism in practice has never required anything more than the energy of human souls, the sapping of said souls, and the closure of that bond with the loss of life for millions.  There is no connection to socialism practiced by modern man for what Jesus practiced was charity; it required nothing in return but the same good intentions, while socialism requires nothing but a follower’s eventual death when they have nothing left to bring to the table (and in the case of socialism, the only thing brought to the table was labor).

The problem with preaching socialism as charity today is that it operates under a few entirely false assumptions.  One, it makes the assumption that even in the event that all of a human being’s basic survival needs are met, that contention cannot arise; that simply being able to breathe, eat, sleep, and wake up to do it all over again is enough for the average man or woman so long as everyone else gets to experience the same comfort.  This is both unnatural and in its own way inhumane.  In a very subtle way, if you consider wealth as the necessary constant behind being able to accomplish all of those things (the tools for such outcomes need to be paid for somehow), the successful practice of socialism requires one to worship nothing more than something with monetary value.  Of course this only makes sense when one allows themselves to consider that things other than coins and printed bills maintain a monetary value, but the idea behind socialism at its core is that individual wealth simply does not matter– the wealth of the sum is more important than the fact that its moving parts have none.  In actuality, submission to socialism’s ideals require its practitioners to assign a dollar amount- whether theoretical or explicit- to the activities that drive one’s inner peace, allowing them to breathe, eat, sleep and wake up with the exact same goals as the family next door.

This is nothing more than abject ignorance of the innate individuality of mankind; its uniqueness as an entity capable of reason, within the animal kingdom.  The question of whether or not Jesus was a socialist is not only illogical, it is dishonest for it links socialism to all that is good- that it is in some way “Christ-like”.

While the ideals of Christ as taught in the Bible throughout multiple denominations of Christianity, or as taught in lessons of the history of mankind, are all admirable ideals and things people of all walks of life would be nothing but rewarded for emulating, such ideals are not present in socialism as we know it.  It is one thing to speak of socialism as a personal choice as a brand of human interaction in a world removed from profits and losses– an other way of saying that one is “charitable”.  Should one describe themselves as a “socialist” while they simply practice charity in the same manner in which Jesus did, there is of course no harm done.  But socialism, in practice among those who have built nations and led man under it, has never been charitable.  It knows nothing but taking, even when it appears as if it is giving.

The question posed by the hundreds, or thousands, of these seemingly innocent authors (and some are) who pop up in Google has evolved from the explicit promotion of socialism as a good replacement for modern capitalism in free societies and democracy– that tactic died with the radical feminist movement of the 60s and 70s.  It has moved on from promoting socialism as a means of perpetuating personal growth and having a stake in the care of your neighbor– that tactic died with the hippies.  What these questions seek to do is take the concept of progressive, modern policy— little more than heavy-handed government edicts which create mirages of growth and stability (often called “progress”)– and link them to being Christ-like.  The medium in which that portrait gets painted is “socialism”.  The question, and ones thesis, paired with tales of Jesus’ charitable works and behavior paints socialism in a rosy, loving shade.  This serves as the fuel which ignites the engine that drives progressive policy and seeks to normalize it as a routine aspect of common and good interactions between human beings.

Unfortunately it is under this guise that the public allows itself to believe that this month’s “record” low unemployment rate is representative of an accurate statistic when it cannot be; it enables the public to ignore the fact that under this nation’s own anointed one, its harbinger of change that was to finally bridge our racial gap, that minorities are poorer and less-employed than they have ever been in recent decades.  None of the realities that so often prevail as the result of socialist policy are apparent for they are over-shadowed by falsehoods in spoken and written words, and by an idea that doesn’t exist: that those who pull the strings of the puppet do so for the good of the puppet- that socialism is the underlying part of democracy which gives it a human touch.  A loving touch, and a grace that compares with Jesus’ washing of his disciples’ feet.

The question about Jesus and socialism is loaded from the get-go, and for a reason.  No one ever really recognizes that reason; perhaps not even those who seek to answer the very question themselves with their articles.  This is, after all, the nature of progressive ideology– it lies beneath the surface under the shroud of empathy, driven by purity.  Like Bill De Blasio told New York City before he became its mayor, a progressive wave is “in their DNA”.  Except progressivism, like socialism, defies what is in a human being’s DNA and the proof is evidenced by the millions who have taken their last breaths prematurely because of it.  Progressivism might be present within human beings at times, but it comes in the form of a unique cancer that is not only malignant, but becomes contagious once it has metastasized.

Progressivism, as with socialism, takes more than it will ever give, and all too often what it gives is little more than a death sentence of both the spirit of the human heart, and that same heart in the flesh.  Jesus, in any form, wouldn’t have anything to do with that.

A letter of thanks from the Reverend

Author’s note:  this is not an actual letter from the Reverend Al Sharpton.

A letter of thanks to the entire population of historically disenfranchised and oppressed people of America:

I know this comes without much surprise, but I must thank you all for once again igniting the fire that keeps me relevant.  The death of Mike Brown in Ferguson- a mere month or so after the death of Eric Garner in Staten Island- has allowed me to once again step into the national spotlight while the rest of the country ignores my television appearances and doesn’t buy my books.  But above all and most importantly, I want to thank you all for creating such an uproar over two very unfortunate events which will enable people like myself, and other progressive liberals, to continue enslaving you and lying to you for another hundred years, if not more.  I mean it’s been two centuries so far, why not make it three?

I want to thank the minority community for ignoring the fact that “big”, and often militarized American police forces are the result of the progressive policies that enable unions to become so powerful and politically influential that who you guys have come to know as “bad cops” cannot be fired no matter what.  I’d also like to thank you for failing to consider that “bad cops” might be the result of the harsh environments we have created for you and relegated you to.  Further, I’d especially like to thank you for following me in my demands for justice- entirely ignoring the fact that my words defy the very definition justice, and have painted Officer Darren Wilson as guilty before we could even so much as hear about an autopsy.  The best part about that is now that we have heard about an autopsy that indicates an event completely unlike that which eye-witnesses recalled, no one even cares about it.  Why would we have to when Mike Brown’s mother has already told us he was a good kid?  The funeral is on television, the White House has sent a delegation to attend that outnumbers that of the one sent to Margaret Thatcher’s funeral, and no one cares about silly things like autopsies when yet another one of our angels has been taken from us.

I’d like to thank you all for ignoring that the perpetually dysfunctional, impoverished, and crime-ridden cities of America where the deaths of young men and women of color are so frequent were built by people like me.  I’d like to thank you for continuing to vote for the progressives who have driven the lower classes of major cities like New York, DC, Detroit, Chicago, Oakland, Los Angeles, and Baltimore (among others) so deep into pits of despair that the only thing keeping their votes guaranteed are the scraps of meat we throw at them from the dinner table of the nation’s 1%-political-elite, and the idea that, somehow, Democrats exactly like me in mind (but not in spirit pigment) are responsible for 100% of the slavery and segregation of this country’s past that has most definitely handicapped your shot at success today, and in the future.  Thank you for your unflinching devotion to the welfare state that we have set up to ensure not that you pull yourselves out of it, but that you remain entrapped in it for life.  Thank you for allowing me to convince you that this is all about white privilege, and that none of it was politically-motivated, or the intent of my buddies in Washington, or of those they followed into power.

(We’re talking about you, LBJ and FDR!)

Thank you for ignoring that I have more blood on my hands than the police forces of this nation combined will ever have; it sure does feel good to be considered a peaceful man of character.  In doing this you’ve set me upon the same perch that civil rights leaders like Martin Luther King, Jr. enjoyed, and you’ve most certainly forgotten that a man of MLK’s character would have despised a deceitful, hateful, and conniving old man like myself.  Thank you for looking at the nation’s law enforcement as a band of thugs, dead-set on targeting young and unarmed “children” of color.  Thank you for talking about how it “has to stop”, and how it is time to respect everyone’s human rights.  Thank you for ignoring how you, as a member of the historically disenfranchised and oppressed people of America, are exponentially more likely to be killed by your friend at school, your neighbor, or even one of your relatives than a police officer.  Thank you for not considering, even if just for a minute, that the aggressive nature of policemen in cities like Ferguson are the result of the notions we have instilled in you from birth through the persistent suffocation of your choices, your talents, and your potential.  Thank you for allowing my colleagues at MSNBC to convince you that black-on-black crime trends are irrelevant and have no place in this discussion- a bunch of black kids have been shot and killed since the death of Mike Brown, but come on- I can’t rake in any cash for that.

You’ve stood by me through the Trayvon Martin episode, where not even one of you considered that both George Zimmerman and Trayvon were in the wrong.  That was impossible.  We just marched in honor of Eric Garner in Staten Island, and while the force used by the NYPD in that situation might have been excessive, none of you would even know who Eric Garner was if that young police officer wasn’t white.  And now we’ve buried another of our unfortunate sons, and you have an entire nation trusting and believing with a full, but heavy heart that he was a man of character- a good person, with a spotless record.

Just like me.

Thank you for the years, and the years yet to come, where we will continue to foster an environment of hatred, violence, gang warfare, dependence, poverty, and the eventual rage that comes along when one of our own is killed by someone who happens to be white– thank you for not reminding your friends in the streets of Ferguson protesting peacefully that this occurs about once for every 1,200 of us who are killed by way of violence.  No one has to know.

Thank you, as always, for allowing me to define what racism is for you.  Thank you for giving me the opportunity to inject race into every discussion imaginable, while being on the same “team” that created just about every single varietal of racism that has infected this country since its founding.  Thank you all for failing to realize, yet again, that labeling young black men who find the wrong end of a gun (when that gun is fired by white people) as immune from guilt, is in fact a racist position.

Thank you for allowing me to be your voice, your mind, and most importantly the force that guides your hand on Election Day.  Without you we couldn’t elect the people who keep allowing me to be here, when I should probably still be sitting in prison.

Keep it up, for me– certainly not for you.  I’ll be here ready to thank you again sometime soon, I’m sure of it.

With love and gratitude,

Albert